Want to Hike in Arizona? 5 Places You Must Visit

Hiking is great for your body and spirit. If you’re looking to build bone density, burn calories, and enjoy the benefits of sunlight and fresh air, Hike in Arizona can be extremely good for your health.

Pairing hiking with camping can make travel easier on your budget and give you great chances to thoroughly check out trails and campgrounds near you.

Antelope Canyon

The Upper Canyon Trail of Antelope Canyon offers beginners a terrific hike in Arizona. This hike is just a mile long, and the elevation gain is mild. If you’re comfortable with ladders, you can also take a ladder down into the Lower Canyon for a longer, tougher hike.

Be aware that you will need a guide to hike the slot canyons; in the event of rain, slot canyons can be dangerous. However, if you can manage the ladders, the images of this trek will stick with you forever.

Building up hiking strength is a skill that will take time. Consider investing in a pack that you can practice loading and carrying to build up your stamina. If you’re hiking solo on simpler trails, you may also want trekking poles to help you build upper body strength.

The time spent building up your core strength will help you carry more gear, which means that you can go a little further into the wilderness. If your intended hike recommends a guide, hire one to avoid getting lost.

Deadmans Pass Trail

The Sedona region offers great Hike in Arizona. Both Boynton Canyon and Long Canyon offer trailhead parking for access to Deadmans Pass Trail, and there is parking on the Mescal Trailhead.

Be aware that you will share this trail; there are hiking trails, equestrian trails, and mountain bike trails all through this region. Coconino National Forest is a terrific area to take a break from the desert heat.

This is a simpler trail for beginning hikers and is a connection between the Boynton Canyon Trail and the Long Canyon Trail, both of which are harder trails with greater elevation.

If you’re not accustomed to higher elevations, start on Deadmans and build up your tolerance for the thinner air. If you start to get a headache or feel terribly tired, stop, air your feet, and drink some water. Elevation sickness is nothing to mess with. Give your body time to adjust.

Tumamoc Hill

Terrific hiking trails surround the city of Tucson. The Hike in Arizona is a bit longer than Deadmans; the round trip on this hike is around three miles.

This trail is open at night, so you can get out after the sun is down and check out the city lights and the desert sky from the same trail. Fall is a great time to be on this trail. Tucson gets pretty hot in the summer!

Winter in the desert can be deceptive. Things will cool down rapidly once the sun goes down, and if the wind comes up you may feel quite chilled on your evening hike. Make sure that you always carry

  • water and sunblock
  • fleece to hold heat to your skin as the weather cools
  • a windbreaker jacket if you get chilled
  • fresh socks and a blister kit

Staying hydrated is critical no matter the temperature. The combination of heat, wind, and elevation can lead to serious problems if your body loses too much fluid. When prepping for a desert height, try to avoid too much caffeine and alcohol, both of which can dehydrate you on the trail.

Piestewa Peak

Hikers near Phoenix will love Piestewa Peak. This trail is under 2 miles but is quite rocky and will take serious focus and require you to do some climbing.

Piestewa Peak is a great option if you’ve been hiking flat trails and are ready for a bigger challenge. Stop and study the signs to learn about native plants and animals.

Consider taking this Hike in Arizona with older children and bringing up a picnic. You will want to share the weight among adults and older children. This is a great time to start investing in sturdy hiking gear.

For example, if your older children are interested in rock climbing or boulder hopping, now is the time to invest in a soft pack that will snug down close to their center of gravity.

Such a pack will reduce the risk of bouncing as they move to avoid overloading their center of gravity. Hiking builds up your legs and your heart, but it also requires you to engage your core muscles. The right pack can allow you to hike longer and stay fed and watered.

Grand Canyon

The Rim to Rim Trail is a trek that people plan for and train for. It can take years to get strong enough to make this hike safely. You will need to carry in food, water, tents, sleeping bags, and pads.

Be aware that the weather can make this Hike in Arizona even more of a challenge; the North Rim trails can be shut down in the winter. Just to get a sense of scale, it takes about 5 hours to drive from the North Rim to the South Rim.

The hike will take you down over 14 miles to the Bright Angel Campground. This campground can get quite crowded, so book your sight in advance. You will want to gear up for this hike. Trekking poles will be necessary to avoid putting too much pressure on your knees.

Trekking poles can also be a great way to build up your upper body strength as you train for this hike. As you train for this hike, you will also enjoy the Bright Angels Trail, which travels from the South Rim to the Colorado River. You’ll want to train for this one as well; it’s a 19-mile hike!

Beginning and expert hikers can find wonderful hiking opportunities around the state of Arizona. Invest in good hiking gear, from trekking poles to packs to shoes and socks.

Always carry water, sunblock, sunglasses, and a hat. Watch the weather and work with professional guides to hike safely and enjoy the beauty of this amazing state!

Also Read:

Top Hiking Trails in US National Parks – How to Plan Your Next Trip

Physical and Mental Health Benefits Of Hiking

12 Hacks for Your Next Hiking Trip

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